David Begbie





It was in the 80’s that I lived in Worrall House, Spitalfields, which exists secretly between Princelet Street and Fournier Street, entirely hidden from view. It is the oldest house in Spitalfields, nearly 300 years old and originally belonged to Samuel Worrall, the master-carpenter for Nicholas Hawksmoor who built Christchurch, Spitalfields, as well as a number of other distinctive East-London churches. Even then Spitalfields was a mysterious and unusual place to live full of interesting and distinguished neighbours, some of them artists such as Gilbert and George and Ricardo Cinalli.
My recent visit to Worrall House assures me that it is still the majestic and peaceful haven as it was when I lived there for many years, whilst the surrounding streets have become part of the new creative centre of the universe and possibly the trendiest place on earth.
I am very pleased to be revisiting Spitalfields with a “Solo Salon Sculpture Exhibition” presented by Tanner & Lawson, London at Townhouse, Spitalfields this coming October and I would be very pleased if you are able to come along to see the show:




14 - 29 Oct 2013
Townhouse, 5 Fournier Street Spitalfields, London E1 6QE

David Begbie

It was in the 80’s that I lived in Worrall House, Spitalfields, which exists secretly between Princelet Street and Fournier Street, entirely hidden from view. It is the oldest house in Spitalfields, nearly 300 years old and originally belonged to Samuel Worrall, the master-carpenter for Nicholas Hawksmoor who built Christchurch, Spitalfields, as well as a number of other distinctive East-London churches. 
Even then Spitalfields was a mysterious and unusual place to live full of interesting and distinguished neighbours, some of them artists such as Gilbert and George and Ricardo Cinalli.

My recent visit to Worrall House assures me that it is still the majestic and peaceful haven as it was when I lived there for many years, whilst the surrounding streets have become part of the new creative centre of the universe and possibly the trendiest place on earth.

I am very pleased to be revisiting Spitalfields with a “Solo Salon Sculpture Exhibition” presented by Tanner & Lawson, London at Townhouse, Spitalfields this coming October and I would be very pleased if you are able to come along to see the show:

14 - 29 Oct 2013

Townhouse, 5 Fournier Street 
Spitalfields, London E1 6QE

Tanner & Lawson at Townhouse Spitalfields
Are delighted to announce their autumn show

Tanya Brett & Jane Lewis
30th Sept - 13th Oct

Private View
2nd October
-
Jane Lewis studied Fine Art at the University of Wales and is now one of Britain’s leading landscape painters. Her work captures the wide-open spaces and big skies of the East Anglia landscape and the changing palette of the seasons from cold grey winters to harvest time. The surface of her work is as important as the colour. Paint gets scraped off, sometimes sanded down and reapplied.
She has exhibited with us for a number of years and her work proven extremely, she is represented in public and private collections across the world. 


“The surface of the work is of equal importance to the content and so the paintings become layered with a combination of smooth and textured areas. Paint gets scraped off, sometimes sanded down, reapplied and so on. .”


-
Tanya Brett studied at Brighton and is now one of the UK’s leading sculptors working in ceramic and bronze. Tanya works into the clay’s surface with scratches and brush strokes bringing vitality to the pieces. The sculptures are finished with a layer of porcelain and high fired. As well as solo exhibitions with Tanner & Lawson Tanya has also exhibited with Adrian Sasoon at The Armory in New York. 
Recent commissions include; Marco Pierre White, Lord Alistair McAlpine, for his Italian Garden and The Plantation House, Mustique.


Since childhood I have been drawn to animals and representations of them in art, from the prehistoric to the contemporary. I am interested in what animals signify to man and how we characterise them from the theatre to toys and how they elicit passions from cruelty to sentimentality.

Tanner & Lawson at Townhouse Spitalfields

Are delighted to announce their autumn show


Tanya Brett Jane Lewis

30th Sept - 13th Oct


Private View

2nd October

-

Jane Lewis studied Fine Art at the University of Wales and is now one of Britain’s leading landscape painters. Her work captures the wide-open spaces and big skies of the East Anglia landscape and the changing palette of the seasons from cold grey winters to harvest time. The surface of her work is as important as the colour. Paint gets scraped off, sometimes sanded down and reapplied.

She has exhibited with us for a number of years and her work proven extremely, she is represented in public and private collections across the world. 

The surface of the work is of equal importance to the content and so the paintings become layered with a combination of smooth and textured areas. Paint gets scraped off, sometimes sanded down, reapplied and so on. .”

-

Tanya Brett studied at Brighton and is now one of the UK’s leading sculptors working in ceramic and bronze. Tanya works into the clay’s surface with scratches and brush strokes bringing vitality to the pieces. The sculptures are finished with a layer of porcelain and high fired. As well as solo exhibitions with Tanner & Lawson Tanya has also exhibited with Adrian Sasoon at The Armory in New York. 

Recent commissions include; Marco Pierre White, Lord Alistair McAlpine, for his Italian Garden and The Plantation House, Mustique.

Since childhood I have been drawn to animals and representations of them in art, from the prehistoric to the contemporary. I am interested in what animals signify to man and how we characterise them from the theatre to toys and how they elicit passions from cruelty to sentimentality.
Kelly McCallum
Kelly McCallum is known for working with taxidermy, precious metals and gems. Here this work becomes more organic, as intricate flowers are constructed from the tiny body-parts of insects. These new species shelter beneath blown-glass cloches, but there is an unsettling sense that this might be to protect the visitors who come to see them, rather than the plants themselves. Only a courting, stuffed fox seems willing to hold them, as a token of his love. Only gold-plated insects seem willing to find a home within their stems and blooms.





This year is the one hundredth anniversary of the Chelsea Flower Show. This is the perfect time to produce “Hortus Conclusus”, exploring ideas of death, pollination and rebirth, offecundity and rarity, and of our relationships with plants, insects and art itself.

Kelly McCallum

Kelly McCallum is known for working with taxidermy, precious metals and gems. Here this work becomes more organic, as intricate flowers are constructed from the tiny body-parts of insects. These new species shelter beneath blown-glass cloches, but there is an unsettling sense that this might be to protect the visitors who come to see them, rather than the plants themselves. Only a courting, stuffed fox seems willing to hold them, as a token of his love. Only gold-plated insects seem willing to find a home within their stems and blooms.

This year is the one hundredth anniversary of the Chelsea Flower Show. This is the perfect time to produce “Hortus Conclusus”, exploring ideas of death, pollination and rebirth, offecundity and rarity, and of our relationships with plants, insects and art itself.

Julie Impens
Julie Impens’s intricate floral pictures bloom from many layers of laser-cut paper, adorned with pearls. Their delicacy belies a dark side, perhaps caught in the corner of one’s vision from a distance, but seen with clarity only when looking far more closely. Images of sex and death appear within the detailed patterns, their meanings simultaneously enhancing and questioning the beauty of the flowers by which they are embraced.










Being from a Catholic family I was told that sex was a sin. Yet we live in a society based on desire. Desire, which should be natural and sane, is made perverse by both the media and religion. My work balances these conflicting aspects of desire: its simplicity and complexity, its purity and sinfulness, its availability and distance.

Julie Impens

Julie Impens’s intricate floral pictures bloom from many layers of laser-cut paper, adorned with pearls. Their delicacy belies a dark side, perhaps caught in the corner of one’s vision from a distance, but seen with clarity only when looking far more closely. Images of sex and death appear within the detailed patterns, their meanings simultaneously enhancing and questioning the beauty of the flowers by which they are embraced.

Being from a Catholic family I was told that sex was a sin. Yet we live in a society based on desire. Desire, which should be natural and sane, is made perverse by both the media and religion. My work balances these conflicting aspects of desire: its simplicity and complexity, its purity and sinfulness, its availability and distance.


Hortus Conclusus
16th - 31st May 2013

Kelly McCallum and Julie Impens at the Tanner & Lawson Gallery
Artists’ Show Reflects, Subverts The Chelsea Flower Show In The Year Of Its Centenary Celebrations

As London celebrates The Chelsea Flower Show in May, Tanner & Lawson is hosting a very different type of horticultural spectacle, in their gallery overlooking Columbia Road Flower Market. Plants stand throughout the space, their flowers formed from myriad insects. Watching from the walls, blooms hide secret trysts within themselves. And yet, the sense of a traditional English flower show remains, enhanced by the serving of afternoon teas, with the artists in attendance.
-
Kelly McCallum is known for working with taxidermy, precious metals and gems. Here this work becomes more organic, as intricate flowers are constructed from the tiny body-parts of insects. These new species shelter beneath blown-glass cloches, but there is an unsettling sense that this might be to protect the visitors who come to see them, rather than the plants themselves. Only a courting, stuffed fox seems willing to hold them, as a token of his love. Only gold-plated insects seem willing to find a home within their stems and blooms.












 “This year is the one hundredth anniversary of the Chelsea Flower Show. This is the perfect time to produce ‘Hortus Conclusus’, exploring ideas of death, pollination and rebirth, offecundity and rarity, and of our    relationships with plants, insects and art itself.”












-
Julie Impens’s intricate floral pictures bloom from many layers of laser-cut paper, adorned with pearls. Their delicacy belies a dark side, perhaps caught in the corner of one’s vision from a distance, but seen with clarity only when looking far more closely. Images of sex and death appear within the detailed patterns, their meanings simultaneously enhancing and questioning the beauty of the flowers by which they are embraced.












“Being from a Catholic family I was told that sex was a sin. Yet we live in a society based on desire. Desire, which should be natural and sane, is made perverse by both the media and religion. My work balances these conflicting aspects of desire: its simplicity and complexity, its purity and sinfulness, its availability and distance.”












-
Richard Swallow and John Tanner












“We are delighted to bring the focus from Chelsea to East London for the show. We are challenging the perception that garden art is all delicate       watercolours and pressed flowers.”












-
About the title, ‘Hortus Conclusus’
'Hortus Conclusus' is a Latin term, meaning ‘enclosed garden’. It has a long history of allegorical meanings in Mediaeval and Renaissance art. The show’s title may be seen, simply, as referring to the placing of the pieces behind glass, or within the exhibition space. A wider interpretation considers the show’s enclosing of deeper themes – beauty and corruption, life and death, the nature of horticulture – within the garden’s construction.
-
About Kelly McCallum
www.kellymccallum.com
Kelly McCallum earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts from Rhode Island School of Design in 2001. She returned in 2003 to spend a year focusing on metalsmithing, before moving to London in 2004. She earned her MA in Applied Arts from the Royal College of Art in 2006. McCallum’s work has been featured repeatedly at the Royal College of Art, and is held in private collections worldwide. She has exhibited in Canada, the USA, Germany, France, Poland, Korea and the UK. In London, her pieces have been shown at the Victoria and Albert Museum, Goldsmith’s Hall, Sotheby’s, Selfridges, Liberty and Shizaru Gallery, Mayfair. Recent exhibitions include “Whispers of Heavenly Death” at Laleh June Gallery, Basel, Switzerland.
-
About Julie Impens
www.julieimpens.com
Julie Impens is a fine artist and jeweller. She earned her Bachelor of Arts in Jewellery Design from Central Saint Martins College of Arts in 2010. As an intern for Jane McAdam Freud and Kelly McCallum she gained a passion for combining aesthetic with meaning. Her work has been seen worldwide, with exhibitions and press in Asia, Europe and the UK, and, most recently, a solo show at Touchstone Gallery in Washington, DC.
-
About Tanner & Lawson
www.tannerlawson.com
Tanner & Lawson is a new gallery in East London, established in 2012 by Richard Swallow and John Tanner it shows works by leading London-based artists. Situated in the heart of the famous Columbia Road Flower Market it has an international clientele. Echoing its surroundings, the gallery has created its own small courtyard garden, inspired by Gertrude Jekyll.
-
Contact
59 Columbia Rd, London E2 7RG
richard@tannerlawson.com


Hortus Conclusus

16th - 31st May 2013


Kelly McCallum and Julie Impens at the Tanner & Lawson Gallery

Artists’ Show Reflects, Subverts The Chelsea Flower Show In The Year Of Its Centenary Celebrations


As London celebrates The Chelsea Flower Show in May, Tanner & Lawson is hosting a very different type of horticultural spectacle, in their gallery overlooking Columbia Road Flower Market. Plants stand throughout the space, their flowers formed from myriad insects. Watching from the walls, blooms hide secret trysts within themselves. And yet, the sense of a traditional English flower show remains, enhanced by the serving of afternoon teas, with the artists in attendance.

-

Kelly McCallum is known for working with taxidermy, precious metals and gems. Here this work becomes more organic, as intricate flowers are constructed from the tiny body-parts of insects. These new species shelter beneath blown-glass cloches, but there is an unsettling sense that this might be to protect the visitors who come to see them, rather than the plants themselves. Only a courting, stuffed fox seems willing to hold them, as a token of his love. Only gold-plated insects seem willing to find a home within their stems and blooms.

 “This year is the one hundredth anniversary of the Chelsea Flower Show. This is the perfect time to produce ‘Hortus Conclusus’, exploring ideas of death, pollination and rebirth, offecundity and rarity, and of our    relationships with plants, insects and art itself.”

-

Julie Impens’s intricate floral pictures bloom from many layers of laser-cut paper, adorned with pearls. Their delicacy belies a dark side, perhaps caught in the corner of one’s vision from a distance, but seen with clarity only when looking far more closely. Images of sex and death appear within the detailed patterns, their meanings simultaneously enhancing and questioning the beauty of the flowers by which they are embraced.

“Being from a Catholic family I was told that sex was a sin. Yet we live in a society based on desire. Desire, which should be natural and sane, is made perverse by both the media and religion. My work balances these conflicting aspects of desire: its simplicity and complexity, its purity and sinfulness, its availability and distance.”

-

Richard Swallow and John Tanner

“We are delighted to bring the focus from Chelsea to East London for the show. We are challenging the perception that garden art is all delicate       watercolours and pressed flowers.”

-

About the title, ‘Hortus Conclusus’

'Hortus Conclusus' is a Latin term, meaning ‘enclosed garden’. It has a long history of allegorical meanings in Mediaeval and Renaissance art. The show’s title may be seen, simply, as referring to the placing of the pieces behind glass, or within the exhibition space. A wider interpretation considers the show’s enclosing of deeper themes – beauty and corruption, life and death, the nature of horticulture – within the garden’s construction.

-

About Kelly McCallum

www.kellymccallum.com

Kelly McCallum earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts from Rhode Island School of Design in 2001. She returned in 2003 to spend a year focusing on metalsmithing, before moving to London in 2004. She earned her MA in Applied Arts from the Royal College of Art in 2006. McCallum’s work has been featured repeatedly at the Royal College of Art, and is held in private collections worldwide. She has exhibited in Canada, the USA, Germany, France, Poland, Korea and the UK. In London, her pieces have been shown at the Victoria and Albert Museum, Goldsmith’s Hall, Sotheby’s, Selfridges, Liberty and Shizaru Gallery, Mayfair. Recent exhibitions include “Whispers of Heavenly Death” at Laleh June Gallery, Basel, Switzerland.

-

About Julie Impens

www.julieimpens.com

Julie Impens is a fine artist and jeweller. She earned her Bachelor of Arts in Jewellery Design from Central Saint Martins College of Arts in 2010. As an intern for Jane McAdam Freud and Kelly McCallum she gained a passion for combining aesthetic with meaning. Her work has been seen worldwide, with exhibitions and press in Asia, Europe and the UK, and, most recently, a solo show at Touchstone Gallery in Washington, DC.

-

About Tanner & Lawson

www.tannerlawson.com

Tanner & Lawson is a new gallery in East London, established in 2012 by Richard Swallow and John Tanner it shows works by leading London-based artists. Situated in the heart of the famous Columbia Road Flower Market it has an international clientele. Echoing its surroundings, the gallery has created its own small courtyard garden, inspired by Gertrude Jekyll.

-

Contact

59 Columbia Rd, London E2 7RG

richard@tannerlawson.com

                                                                     Jordan Jon Hodgson

                                                               www.jordanhodgson.com


Bestial Ceramic Mugs (x20) - Generation 1

                                                                     Jonathan Leech

Jonathan’s relationship with wood began when he began a part-time job working for top Cumbrian furniture-maker, Danny Frost

I’ve spent most of my life in the Cumbrian countryside and combine my other keen interests – cycling and walking – with searching for beautiful and unusual pieces of timber. All my wood is locally-sourced and is obtained sustainably, for example from fallen or storm-damaged trees. It’s then air- and kiln-dried before being shaped by hand into a bowl, dish or platter. The final stages include fine sanding and finishing with lemon oil, to give a perfectly smooth finish.

His preferred style is ‘minimalist’, using a simple design which allows the wood to express its own qualities. This often includes natural edges, knot-holes, burrs, spalting, and other naturally-occurring imperfections. Each piece is truly unique.

                                                                        Joe Hogan

Joe Hogan has been making baskets at Loch na Fooey since 1978 and in that time has earned a reputation for making strong, durable baskets of the highest quality. The colours in these award winning baskets are those of the natural willows which are grown at Loch na Fooey.

Joe also offers a special 4 day basketmaking course tailored to all abilities. The aim of these courses is to provide a thorough imparting of techniques in a relaxed and enjoyable atmosphere. For beginners the concentration will be on round work and each participant can expect to make 2 - 4 baskets depending on size and have acquired enough skill to practice on their own. Those with previous experience can choose between round, oval, or square.


Click Here for more information about these courses.

                                                                         Sam Edkins

Sam Edkins is a London based artist/designer living and working around Deptford. He studied Fine Art at Goldsmith College. His work is a combination of the sculptural and the practical.

The outcome is often assemblage based. Marrying the old with the new to creating something contemporary and bespoke. The work combines traditional craft and technology. Bringing to life the forgotten, an adding a new veneer.

Taking inspiration from the cabinet of curiosity, museums and personal collections alike. Using them as a source of reference, visually, conceptually and historically. Containing a degree of nostalgia the work harks back to a time when knowledge was craved and a desire to understand the world was paramount.


The Anatomically Correct Series

These pieces make reference to Memento Mori, a theme often depicted in art and Classical antiquity. They are luxuriously over stuffed offering a Bourgeois comfort, borrowing from the look of Victorian parlor furniture. They convey an air of humour and of the bizarre.The chairs are old pieces fully reconditioned and upholstered. As a process this allows me to embroider a new history into them and makes each one slightly different. The shape of the chair allows the print to flow into the chair structure, giving a figurative character and seeming to personify the piece. The images are sourced from old medical journals. They are adapted and then digitally printed.


Anatomically Correct Chair. I  - £595 SOLD

Anatomically Correct Chair. II - £595 SOLD

Anatomically Correct Chair. III  - £595 SOLD

Anatomically Correct Chair. IV  - £595

The Entomology Series  - £200

                                                                       Tracey Davies

In 2007, Tracey, an avid crafter, embarked on a degree in contemporary textiles and needed a focus for her portfolio. It seemed natural to draw on a lifelong passion for dogs. “I’ve always had lurchers and, most recently, whippets, Jazz and Zorro. It was when she realised that the large-scale embroideries made on the course wouldn’t fit into typical Lancashire terraced houses, such as hers, that Tracey sought an alternative art form. “I came up with needle felting,” she says. “You only need knitting needles and some carded wool. I started off making a model of Jazz, stabbing away until I had a rough shape, then refined it until I was satisfied.”

Now it takes just a week to produce a whippet – or indeed the breed of your choice, as, after crafting for family and friends, and exhibiting at a local gallery, Tracey does commissions. “The first time I made one to order was nerve-wracking,” she recalls. “People are particular about their pets and I was working from a photo of a spaniel. Fortunately the customer was pleased and I’ve since made lurchers and a pug.”

A technician at a higher education college, Tracey has recently combined knowledge of other hands-on skills with her hobby. “I now make miniature chairs for the dogs and have also knitted woollen jumpers for them, which are proving very popular.” It seems the options are endless, and there’s good news to be had for cat-lovers – felines are next on her list. Her price ranges from £150 (smaller dogs like Terrier’s) up to £190 (for larger breeds like greyhounds).

Tracey Davies was named 'Crafts Person of the Year 2012' by Country Living Magazine.


Terrier (11 x 9 cm) needle felted - £150

Scottish Terrier (11 x 9 cm) needle felted - £150